Bus Conversions dot Com Bulletin Board
October 25, 2014, 06:53:16 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: If you had an Online Subscription: It arrives at least two weeks before the First Class printed magazine.
   Home   Help Forum Rules Search Calendar Login Register BCM Home Page Contact BCM  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: removing original walls, ceiling and floor  (Read 1874 times)
oldallegro
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 19




Ignore
« on: June 13, 2006, 10:52:44 PM »

We are trying to decide if it is necessary to remove the original walls, floor and ceiling in our 1990 MCI 9.  We plan to be fulltiming up North in Montana, Wisconsin, New York, etc.  My question is this:  Between firing strips, cleaning, insulation, wiring, plumbing and whatever else, is it best to just scrap all that original stuff and start fresh or can we accomplish the conversion without all that waste?  I asked a similar question a few days ago, but maybe this topic will make my inquiry more clear.  Thanks.  Kurt
Logged
KC Eagle
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 22


83 Eagle in process




Ignore
« Reply #1 on: June 14, 2006, 04:33:10 AM »

Kurt - we just started our first conversion last September and that was one of the first decisions we had to make also. It's ALOT of work! But judging from what I found I am definetly glad we decided to remove the existing interior. I understand the MCI has some stainless, but out Eagle had a few rusty tubes I cut out and replaced which were not visible until I removed the interior. The factory insulation (1.5" fiberglass) was inadequate and carried 20+ years of dirt which we are replacing with double faced foamboard (spray foam would be better but big $$). We are covering this with 1/2" plywood secured with TEC screws. This also gave us the opportunity to insulate the bays from above - easier than working upside down in the bay. Judging from your choice of climate, I would want the best insulation I could get.

Kurt W. (I'm also a 'Kurt')
Logged
JackConrad
Orange Blossom Special II
Global Moderator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4447


73' MC-8 8V71/HT740 Southwest Florida


WWW
« Reply #2 on: June 14, 2006, 04:44:54 AM »

Kurt,
    I agree with KC Eagle.  If you are going to full-time and might be spending time in cold country, you want as much R value as you can get/afford. Removing all the interior is a lot of work, but removes a lot of filth and lets you check all framing for any rust/corrosion. Better to repair rust damage now rather than when you are living in it full time.
   I have been in a few coaches that have sat for a while and have an unpleastant musty/moldy smell.  When I asked, they said that they did not remove any of the OEM insulation or heact/AC ductwork. When we removed our OEM heat/AC ductwork, I was amazed at the amount of filth that I found.  JMO, YMMV.  Jack
Logged

Growing Older Is Mandatory, Growing Up Is Optional
Arcadia, Florida, When we are home
http://s682.photobucket.com/albums/vv186/OBS-JC/
gumpy
Some Assembly Required
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3268


Slightly modified 1982 MC9


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #3 on: June 14, 2006, 05:30:19 AM »

Here's one of the reasons you might want to remove the floors...



There's more here...

http://www.gumpydog.com/bus/MC9_WIP/Structural/Floor_Removal/floor_removal.htm
Logged

Craig Shepard
Located in Minnesquito

http://bus.gumpydog.com - "Some Assembly Required"
El-Sonador
Guest

« Reply #4 on: June 14, 2006, 05:50:39 AM »

Kurt... Hi

I removed some wall and ceiling panels where needed to run wiring etc, and the insulation, condition and cleanliness were all good, so I kept it all in place to save work and time. However, I didn't remove my floor and I don't know if that is a bad thing or not. I lived in the bus through one Canadian winter and found the floor to be the coldest. Now that my bus is completed, I'm faced with insulating the floor from the underside in the luggage bays. I'm talking about 20 or 30 below; so the water has to be completely shut down during those temps anyways... But when the temps are just 5 or 10 below, just one small ceramic heater seems to make everything, including the floor cosy.

I do regret not knowing what is under the floor, even though I believe it is all good. I would certainly rip up a few sections just to have a look if I was to do it again...


Steve
Logged
Burgermeister
Guest

« Reply #5 on: June 14, 2006, 06:10:42 AM »

In addition to what Gumpy showed can be included in the underfloor areas of a MCI, I would also take up the floor for another reason.

The fiberglass wheel well caps can be damaged by micro or mini punctures by stones and road debris.  If you were at my shop,  I could show you two MCI-9s (both with floors currently removed).  Just passenger front would be enough.

When driving on wet roads, a fine silt is tossed from the tires to find it's way into the space between the top of the wheel well and below the floor.

It piles up throughout the space above the wheel well.   Not all metal below the floor is SS.  The structure supporting the wheel well is mild steel.

The silt piles up 1-2" deep and acts as a sponge in wet conditions, ensuring plenty of moisture to continue corrosion long after things dry on the outside.   The mild steel in both are like swiss cheese and will be replaced. 

BTW,  in Gumpy's photo,  that's more than dust.  It includes lots of hair, flaked skin,  chewing gum, candy.  A bus mechanic said he one found a condom in the return air.   
Logged
TomC
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 6854





Ignore
« Reply #6 on: June 14, 2006, 06:53:01 AM »

Now mind you that my bus is a transit that has hundreds of door openings a day-so lots of dirt.  Not only dirt, but being able to inspect the condition of the bare skeleton, replace or reweld weak spots, run your electrical up to the roof A/C's and power vents. I screwed to the up rights 1x2 fir strips horizontally placed about a foot across so I could have a little more thickness to the wall and to have something to screw to for the walls (1/4" plywood) and the ceiling (1/8" plywood).  Since it is all screwed in, it also can be easily removed.  I ended up with 2.25" of blown in foam (not sure the R factor).  But the interior is still a usable 96" (102 outside).  Just for peace of mind and plainly curiousity, I'd do it again the same way-even though it is a dirty, hard job (but the whole conversion is that!)  Good Luck, TomC
Logged

Tom & Donna Christman. '77 AMGeneral 10240B; 8V-71TATAIC V730.
FloridaCliff
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2458


"The Mighty GMC"




Ignore
« Reply #7 on: June 14, 2006, 07:19:42 AM »

Kurt,

As stated by all above very well, I too think it is an effort worth doing.

In my case I had a few obvious old leaks, but I was amazed at how thw water snaked its way down the side of the bus.

I found several places where I replaced some steel that I would not have been aware of.

I also found some insulation bags still sopping wet after a month out of the elements.

I removed all the all the factory insulation, as Jack said it gets a musty odor.

Even though its a lot of work, I would do it again.

Best of Luck,

Cliff
Logged

1975 GMC  P8M4905A-1160    North Central Florida

"There are basically two types of people. People who accomplish things, and people who claim to have accomplished things. The first group is less crowded."
Mark Twain
Nick Badame Refrig/ACC
1989, MCI 102C3, 8V92T, HT740, 06' conversion FMCA# F-27317-S "Wife- 1969 Italian/German Style"
Global Moderator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4874


Nick & Michelle Badame


WWW
« Reply #8 on: June 14, 2006, 07:52:07 AM »

Hello oldallegro,

Like has been said many times above, It's worth doing.

My return air channel in the floor was very dirty. And I'm glad now that I did!

Nick
Logged

Whatever it takes!-GITIT DONE! 
Commercial Refrigeration- Ice machines- Heating & Air/ Atlantic Custom Coach Inc.
Master Mason- Cannon Lodge #104
https://www.facebook.com/atlanticcustomcoach
www.atlanticcustomcoach.com
mikeH8H-649
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 129




Ignore
« Reply #9 on: June 14, 2006, 08:38:56 AM »

Kurt,I have to agree with everyone else,my original plan was for a stock looking buffalo ext and to cover over the inside and have it ready to live in in about 5 or 6 months now 13 months later it has been stripped to nothing and completly rebuilt with 10"raise and lots of money and hours I am glad I went this way with all of the rust and damage I found and repaired,if I was not so hard headed I would have kept my drive train and got another shell about 8 months ago,we like you will be fulltime and so I figured that any extra work or money spent now will not be regretted later but corners cut to save now will haunt me later.Mike
Logged
brojcol
Jimmy
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 459




Ignore
« Reply #10 on: June 14, 2006, 10:47:15 AM »

Hey Gumpy:

YUCK!!! I just looked at the pics of you removing your floor.  You guys should have been wearing masks.

Jimmy
Logged

"Ask yourself this question...Are you funky enough to be a globetrotter?  Well are you???  ARE YOU?!?!

deal with it."            Professor Bubblegum Tate
gumpy
Some Assembly Required
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3268


Slightly modified 1982 MC9


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #11 on: June 14, 2006, 11:07:13 AM »

Hey Gumpy:

YUCK!!! I just looked at the pics of you removing your floor.  You guys should have been wearing masks.

Jimmy

Probably.
Logged

Craig Shepard
Located in Minnesquito

http://bus.gumpydog.com - "Some Assembly Required"
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.18 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!