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Author Topic: whats it like to live in arizona summer/winter  (Read 2903 times)
Lonnie time to go
Lonnie
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« on: June 15, 2008, 09:53:06 PM »

Just wondering what arizona is like at different times of the year.
I have family down there but would like more opinions.
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1976 4905
tekebird
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« Reply #1 on: June 15, 2008, 09:55:24 PM »

depends on where in AZ
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sommersed
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« Reply #2 on: June 15, 2008, 09:57:15 PM »

Cannot really answer without knowing which part of the state.  Are you talking Sea Level or above the snow line?
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Lonnie time to go
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« Reply #3 on: June 15, 2008, 10:42:18 PM »

vail is where our relatives live so its between that or yuma thanks
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1976 4905
Chaz
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« Reply #4 on: June 16, 2008, 07:00:35 AM »

I have never lived there - only extended visits - but my plans are to hang out in Sedona. Hopefully a couple months this winter if I get everything done to my bus. It's truely beautiful, and I NEVER thought I would say that about a desert state.
  Phoenix tends to be a bit on the hot side in the summer  Roll Eyes (understatement) and Flagstaff can get 100" of snow in the winter. So you could actually run around the state and find weather close to your liking about anytime.
  Tucson was pretty nice too really. Lemon Mountain was really neat and great climate when I was there.
  Quartzite is supposed to be a neat venue for a short time also. Not sure about the rest of the year.
  Maybe Arizona Tourism Board (or whatever like that) would be a good place to start also.
 
    Limited knowledge, but hope it helps.
       Chaz

   p.s. I'd also like to know more about different areas.
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H3Jim
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« Reply #5 on: June 16, 2008, 07:14:39 AM »

Summer in the southern parts are in the 115 degree range.  The frequent refrain "but its a dry heat", does acknowledge that it's better than that same temp say in  Houston, but any way you slice it, 115 is damn hot.  Air conditionining is a requirement, and always making sure you  have water is important too.  Do not work outside in the heat of the day.  Winters in that same area are lovely, lathough temps can get down close to freezing sometimes at night.  Commonly 60's during the day, sunny.  Very few insects because its dry.

Sedona is a magical place.  Spiritual.  Beautiful.  High end everything too with price tags to match.  Too hot in the summer as well, although there are some canyons that stay cooler, and its close to a much higher elevation so could be driveablefrom there.  Lots of traffic, tourists on 2 lane roads.

A friend just spent some time in Flagstaff area at the end of May and was snowed on every day he was there.

Yuma is composed mainly of either hispanic or retirees. Probably 50% of the radio stations are in spanish, more still play only mexican music.
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Jim Stewart
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edvanland
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« Reply #6 on: June 16, 2008, 10:11:46 AM »

The weather in Arizona.  I live in Cornville, 10 miles from Sedona.  Yes it gets hot in the day time in the summer but cools down at night.  I deliver papers and start the morning 2AM with a long sleeve shirt and sometimes a jacket, then out of the jacket, then out of the long sleeve shirt.  Want to be in the snow in the winter, go to Flagstaff.  Just had some friends in from Texas.  We both ride trikes and had a ball. They said they did not know there was so much beautiful area to see.  Would not live any other place, ups when I retire I will travle the United States, north in the summer and south in the winter.  Chaz if you or any one else comes to Sedona or the Verde VAlley give me a call.
Ed
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Ed Van
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Cornville, AZ
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« Reply #7 on: June 16, 2008, 10:26:29 AM »

I live in Mohave Valley the summers are very hot but a great thing about AZ  like where we live 200 miles or less and you are in the mountains and cool weather same applies to the Phoenix area plus I love to Christmas shop in my shorts and tee shirt
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larryh
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« Reply #8 on: June 16, 2008, 11:51:48 AM »

I live in Quartzsite now I leave for the north West when it hits 100 for two days in a row I have seen 128.8 in August when wife was in hospital before passing away. That is not fit for man nor beast and I think I fall in there somewhere. For 6 months of the year I don't think anybetter place to ride the GoldWing.

LarryH Grin Shocked Roll Eyes Shocked

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Quartzsite,
Chaz
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« Reply #9 on: June 16, 2008, 01:41:18 PM »

Maybe I should start another thread instead of hijacking this one, but maybe this is close enough......... Roll Eyes
  Can you fill us in a little more about how you do your time there, Larry?? Costs, where you stay, ammenities, good roads to ride my '46 Harley on?? You know, all the "important" stuff!  Grin Grin 
  I was thinking Sedona area the whole time, but splitting up my time might be a cool idea. I'm just curious about "what and where" in Quartzite.

  Thanx and sorry about the "sorta" hijack,
       Chaz
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David Anderson
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« Reply #10 on: June 16, 2008, 05:01:01 PM »

Chaz,

I've had real good info for subjects like this on the Woodalls website forum.  Just search "Sedona" or other relevant  words in its forum search engine and go back to the archives and all kinds of neat comments come up.  I registered as a member and post very little, mainly I just troll.  However, questions get answered quickly and frequently when asked.  It is a fun site.

http://www.woodalls.com/cforum/index.cfm?site=WPD

David
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Dreamscape
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« Reply #11 on: June 16, 2008, 06:17:19 PM »

I lived in the Phoenix area for about 10 years in the late 80's and early 90's. It's hot in the summer and very nice in the winter. I was there last week and didn't recognize it. So many changes and lots of freeways.

We used to go to Sedona and all points north in the summer, lots of snow in Flagstaff in the winter.

Tucson is another place I used to live, I still have my oldest daughter and her family there. If it were up to me that would me my choice for the winter months. Mountains to look at and the cactus blooming is fantastic in the spring. It is a little higher than Phoenix so the weather is not so extreme in the summer.

Yeah, it's a dry heat all right. I think of it more like sticking your head in oven and trying to breathe.  Grin WOW, it can be brutal......

Just my two cents,

Paul
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Chaz
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« Reply #12 on: June 17, 2008, 06:50:37 AM »

David,
 Thanx for the tip on Woodall's!! Thats excellent! I did not know it existed. I read a bunch, but have allot more to read. I hope others are aware of this site. It ranks right up there with this one and is a perfect compliment to it. Once you get your bus running and ready to go, they have great info on doing just that.
 
   Very appreciative,
       Chaz

 
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Kwajdiver
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« Reply #13 on: June 17, 2008, 04:43:17 PM »

I spent last summer, in my motor coach, in Phoenix.  There was NOTHING I could do to keep the coach other than HOT.  I have two roof mount AC units.  I put up installation is all windows, nothing beat the heat.  When I departed Phoenix a left at midnight, so the bus would not over heat.

Now don't get me wrong, I had a great time while working there.  Dry heat or not, it's hot.  Try this, turn your oven up to 115, and stick your head in, welcome to the desert.

Bill
Tampa Bay
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