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Author Topic: Tag Axle Wheels  (Read 4379 times)
NewbeeMC9
NewbeeMC9
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1981 MC9 8V71, HT 740




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« Reply #15 on: July 16, 2008, 05:25:26 PM »



It breaks the wind noise that would set up a harmonic after it pass between the duallys so the bus won't sound like a truck and the passengers have a smooth quiet ride Huh

(watch your step on that one Cheesy)

Also, if the tire was lined up the drivewheel would stick out way past the drive wheel.   I believe the tag tracks with the front wheel though.  and both tag and front tires should line up with bearing center lines.


many choices, so have you picked your reason Kenny Huh Wink
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It's all fun and games til someone gets hurt. Wink
Blacksheep
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« Reply #16 on: July 17, 2008, 04:35:09 AM »

Dave correct me if I'm wrong but I thought a TWIN SCREW was referred to when a truck had tandem axles meaning two rears both with duals! Tags don't usually have a drive type rear to my knowledge so was never considered a drive axle hence being referred to as a tag! It's kind of just there rolling along supporting weight! I may be completely wrong but I was under the impression that this was the case!
BS
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makemineatwostroke
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« Reply #17 on: July 17, 2008, 05:03:55 AM »

Are you Crown guys confused on which axle is the boogie and which is the tag on your tandem
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kyle4501
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PD4501 South Carolina




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« Reply #18 on: July 17, 2008, 05:12:01 AM »

GM spaced the front wheels wider than the rear on 4X4's for better traction.

On the 4501, you can unload the tag which will shift the pivot point forward for a shorter turning radius  Grin

On a side note, a friend just drove his 4501 across the scales. ~7100# front axle & ~20,500# on both rears for a total weight of ~27,600#
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I know you believe you understand what you think I said, but I am not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant. (R.M. Nixon)
skipn
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« Reply #19 on: July 17, 2008, 06:56:37 AM »

 
   Kenny,

     So far you have 2 posts for wheel scuffing prevention. If you are considering
  moving the bogies out I might reconsider.....if you are going to be driving in snow.
  Snow/ice chunks can build up behind the duals and when they finally break off
  you could have quit a bump in the road Smiley

 Sorry we weren't great help

 Skip
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Hartley
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« Reply #20 on: July 17, 2008, 09:10:13 AM »

Dave correct me if I'm wrong but I thought a TWIN SCREW was referred to when a truck had tandem axles meaning two rears both with duals! Tags don't usually have a drive type rear to my knowledge so was never considered a drive axle hence being referred to as a tag! It's kind of just there rolling along supporting weight! I may be completely wrong but I was under the impression that this was the case!
BS

I was referring to a tandem or dual drive axle configuration. Ie: Crown and I think the Flx VL100? (someone said that a while back??) or was it a mexican dina/sultana???

The Scenicruiser had dual wheels on their tags but still only a single drive axle.

However that works out, The MCI tag being offset might allow the use of a Big Single
configuration, Not that its needed but someone will bite that bullet playing around to make
stuff look neat.

Don't mind me, I am crazy anyway..

Dave...
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Dallas
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« Reply #21 on: July 17, 2008, 09:39:40 AM »

Dave correct me if I'm wrong but I thought a TWIN SCREW was referred to when a truck had tandem axles meaning two rears both with duals! Tags don't usually have a drive type rear to my knowledge so was never considered a drive axle hence being referred to as a tag! It's kind of just there rolling along supporting weight! I may be completely wrong but I was under the impression that this was the case!
BS

Ace, Twin Screw is the standard nomenclature in the trucking industry for a tractor that has 2 differentials, one on each axle. Both Differentials don't always pull at the same time, there is a switch on the dash called a "Power Divider" or a "Differential Interlock". The term really has nothing to do with the number of tires on the axles.... I had a quad Axle, triple screw set up with 2 tags both of which raised off the ground to increase traction, ( a real PITA to keep up maintenance wise).
Mostly the Power Divider supplies power to the rear drive axle until the switch is engaged which then allows a gear to lock in the front axle. This is used mostly for getting unstuck from slick spots or snowy/icy hills.

If anyone is interested, there was also a system called "Belt Drive" which is just what the name implies.. there was a big belt between the drive axle and the tag axle(which had duals on it), and the theory was that when you were driving around in less than ideal conditions, the tag would act like a drive axle and get you loose.... It didn't work well at all to say the least. Just another idea thought up by an engineer who thought the numbers crunched showed that it was a great idea.
What actually happened was that there was no way to keep the belt tight between the axles so, after a couple of thousand miles of running around on highway and out in the muddy lettuce fields, the belt was so worn that when it came time for it to do it's job, it was too loose to provide friction to the tag axle.

Here's another question.... has any one ever seen a Mack with a tandem axle, with hard rubber tires and a chain drive to both axles?

Dallas
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skipn
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« Reply #22 on: July 17, 2008, 09:47:50 AM »


 Dallas
 MAC or REO 2 ton coal truck?

Skip
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Dallas
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« Reply #23 on: July 17, 2008, 10:09:10 AM »


 Dallas
 MAC or REO 2 ton coal truck?

Skip

The one we had was a Mack, 1915 Vintage that had originally been built for use by the U.S.Army for service in the "Great War to end all Wars".

Now, do you know which side to stand on to crank the engine with the hand crank?  Wink

Dallas
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H3Jim
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« Reply #24 on: July 17, 2008, 11:02:49 AM »

I believe it was to the left of the crank.  That way you are pulling up on the handle.  If the engine backfired, as many did, then it would only rip the crank handle out of your hand rather than breaking your arm.
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Jim Stewart
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Travel is more than the seeing of sights, it is a change that goes on, deep  and permanent, in the ideas of living.
Sojourner
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« Reply #25 on: July 17, 2008, 11:09:23 AM »

Along with the thumb under the pull or your arm will receive the backfired kick.

Learned that from 4-H tractor club during late 40's.

Sojourn for Christ, Jerry
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Catskinner!
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« Reply #26 on: July 17, 2008, 12:44:58 PM »

Kenny

I don't know why they made the offset like they did, but I agree with the looks.

When I made all the changes on my Eagle,  I had the air lift tag axle built to the

same dimension as my drive axle and turned the tag wheel out to align with

my drive wheels.  Also I could run duals on the tag if i wanted to,  The Mfg. said

I would loose about 25% of the carrying capacity, but this wasn't a problem since

the tag was rated at 25,000 Lbs.  I have put almost 70,000 miles on this setup

and have not noticed any more tire wear than normal.


Catskinner!
Sonnie Gray
73 0/5 Eagle 3406 Cat
Pottsboro, Texas
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Blacksheep
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« Reply #27 on: July 17, 2008, 01:06:19 PM »

Dallas, I wasn't saying that because each axle has 2 tires was referred to as a "twin screw! What I always was told was a truck that has 2 axles, both with dual wheels, and each axle having it's own drive gear/rear was referred to as a "twin screw", hence the 2 seperate rear ends! In fact, I think there could have even been some dual axle, both with drive rear ends with single tires instead of duals back in the day!
BS
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luvrbus
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« Reply #28 on: July 17, 2008, 01:08:49 PM »

Kenny it must be a MCI thing they do not look good to me and I don't know the reasoning behind it the Eagle 01 made in the 60's had the tag matched with outside driver wheel and the MOL built Eagles with the air lift tag were align with outside driver and so is the model 25
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HB of CJ
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« Reply #29 on: July 17, 2008, 02:05:41 PM »

How about aligning the tags soossss they will miss most (some?) of the sharp stuff that gets tossed up by the front drivers?  I know on my old 10-wheeler Crown Super Coach the rear duels were more apt to get flats from stuff run over safely by the front duels, then flipped back onto/into the rears.  Dunno if the tags wore out any quicker; don't remember.  Too long ago.  Smiley Smiley Smiley
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