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Author Topic: Cummins ISM Oil pan help  (Read 3867 times)
buswarrior
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'75 MC8 8V71 HT740




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« Reply #15 on: August 13, 2008, 07:53:38 PM »

Yup, you want to get that thing hiked up...

the driveway into the wrong Cracker Barrel will nail you.

If folks could see how close their rear gets to the ground when dealing with ups and downs in and out of sloped driveways, it just might scare them...

I'm wondering if searching out the fleets that ran those engines/pans and finding out where the motor work gets done, or the scrap buses went might help?

That pan get used for other applications besides buses?

happy coaching!
buswarrior

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Brian Diehl
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« Reply #16 on: August 13, 2008, 07:55:27 PM »

Yup, you want to get that thing hiked up...

That pan get used for other applications besides buses?

happy coaching!
buswarrior




I have no idea if anyone else ever ran that pan.  I think buses are really the only application where it is really needed...
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NJT5047
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« Reply #17 on: August 13, 2008, 08:03:07 PM »

Yep.  I agree.  If the pan is below the pumpkin...no good....and I wouldn't overinflate the drive bags, just set them to standard specs and leave them alone otherwise.  Which you have done.
May I ask what you have invested in your engine conversions??  Or proximal? 
I'm on and off on the engine thing.  My bus runs great...so far.  If it crapped, what you have done, is impressive, and is a route that I would seriously consider. 
Jerry Campbell's and Gary Nixon's  S50 conversion into a 102A3 and MC8 respectfully, are also very nice. 
I believe the ISM 6 would be smoother.  And the Eaton transmission appeals to my taste also. 

JR
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JR Lynch , Charlotte, NC
87 MC9, 6V92TA DDEC, HT748R ATEC

"Every government interference in the economy consists of giving an unearned benefit, extorted by force, to some men at the expense of others.

Ayn Rand
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« Reply #18 on: August 13, 2008, 08:05:41 PM »

Quote
I have no idea if anyone else ever ran that pan.  I think buses are really the only application where it is really needed...


What about marine applications? They use shallow oil pans.  Are ISMs found in a marine environment?
Does this pan fit any other Cummins engines?
JR
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JR Lynch , Charlotte, NC
87 MC9, 6V92TA DDEC, HT748R ATEC

"Every government interference in the economy consists of giving an unearned benefit, extorted by force, to some men at the expense of others.

Ayn Rand
makemineatwostroke
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« Reply #19 on: August 13, 2008, 08:06:19 PM »

Brain try TH Evans in Georiga 1-800-248-8889  have a great evening
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Brian Diehl
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« Reply #20 on: August 14, 2008, 07:20:40 AM »

Brain try TH Evans in Georiga 1-800-248-8889  have a great evening

I chatted with TH Evans and they did not have anything.
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Brian Diehl
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« Reply #21 on: August 14, 2008, 07:22:20 AM »

I found a pan at ABC MN.  The pan has a crack in it and the gentleman I talked to said he will sell it to me for scrap value since he thinks all weld repairs to the aluminum pans fail.  What do you guys think?  Is it possible to clean up the pan enough to get a good weld repair on the crack?  I would bring the pan to a guy I know who welds aluminum since I don't have the experience or equipment to weld aluminum.
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luvrbus
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« Reply #22 on: August 14, 2008, 07:32:15 AM »

Brain, glad you found 1 if the pan is welded right it be as strong a new
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skipn
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« Reply #23 on: August 14, 2008, 07:36:25 AM »

Brian,

   To me it really depends on 2 things... given you have a guy that can do the job.

   1. where is the crack at......Oil pans are not a high stress item but cracks around the drain and breather
       could be touchey.
   2. Is the pan true....if it was warped then after the welding is done and you go to put it back on, it
       could split along the weld.........

  If the price was right I'd give it a shot..........if it did leak a bit you could just say you had a DD  Shocked

FWIW
 Skip
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junkman42
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« Reply #24 on: August 14, 2008, 07:58:19 AM »

Brian, if the welder is a real welder You should have no problem welding a cast al pan.  Soak the pan in acetone and dry a couple of times, bake in a oven at 150f or so and weld with pan at least above 180f or so.  Also grove the pan on both sides and weld from each end of the crack to the middle and do so on both sides.  Also You should dye check the ends of the crack and stop drill the ends so a crack does not propagate from an unseen crack.  I would a high silicon rod but perhaps Your welder has a better suggestion.  John
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luvrbus
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« Reply #25 on: August 14, 2008, 08:08:17 AM »

Brian how John describes the process is the way I watched a automotive head shop repair aluminum heads
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Busted Knuckle
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« Reply #26 on: August 14, 2008, 08:28:43 AM »

Brian if done right it will last! Grin  BK  Grin
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Busted Knuckle aka Bryce Gaston
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makemineatwostroke
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« Reply #27 on: August 14, 2008, 08:35:47 AM »

Go for it is not like you will putting a 100,000 miles plus on your bus a year as they do with the Van Hools ABC sells
« Last Edit: August 14, 2008, 08:38:44 AM by makemineatwostroke » Logged
Brian Diehl
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« Reply #28 on: August 14, 2008, 04:46:18 PM »

Well, the pan is mine for $20.  Now I just need to find a place to get it welded with the facilities to clean it properly and prep it correctly.  The pan is not warped or dented, but does have on crack in line with a baffle and the drain plug was punched into the pan.  I have the plug and it looks like plenty of aluminum left to weld it correctly on the inside and outside.  I'll ask the welder to put an extra layer of aluminum plate around the plug on the outside once it has been welded back in.
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Bob Belter
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« Reply #29 on: August 15, 2008, 04:29:44 PM »

Ahoy, Brian,

Cummins ISM  --  M-11 Oil Pan depth reduction.

Piece of cake (If your ISM has a pan like my M-11)

On my stamped steel M-11 oil pan on my Eagle-01, I just scarfed the bottom (at a slight angle to aid oil change drainage) and welded a new bottom on it.  Absolutley no problem.  I shortened the oil pick-up tube, and put a 'box flanged' rectangular cavitation plate on it, with a screen.  Don't get too heavy with the cavitation plate and stuff.  You don't want it to fatigue and fall off. I used 4130 steel.050" thick.  I don't recall the exact depth or size of the cavitation 'box'  --- but I recall about 3"x4"x 3/4" deep with about 3/4" clearance from the bottom.   No problems in ~~36,000 miles.

I will measure the distance from the pan flange and the bottom and post it here.

Enjoy  /s/  Bob
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