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Author Topic: Generator exhaust  (Read 6545 times)
Dreamscape
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« Reply #15 on: August 17, 2008, 02:35:11 PM »

I figured it would be the right stuff!

I shoulda known.  Roll Eyes

Great idea, bet it stores up real nice too.

Paul
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gus
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« Reply #16 on: August 17, 2008, 04:59:50 PM »

My exhaust system is very short. The muffler is bracketed directly to the bottom  of the gen and the end of the exhaust is held by a flexible clamp to the sled supporting the gen since there is some slight movement between the gen and sled.

I wouldn't place the muffler directly against anything metal because it gets so hot, even with heat protection wrapped around it. The heat transfered to the bus metal frame can be tremendous.

My old gen was bad at heating the bus frame so I made sure the new one was well insulated.
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PD4107-152
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« Reply #17 on: August 17, 2008, 06:49:03 PM »

We use a CO Detector inside the bus and our exhaust exits right under our bedroom window. We have spent MANY nights sleeping above the running genset and are still alive to talk about it. But you typically have the windows closed and the AC on when you are running the gen.


I think the CO detector and the windows closed are the key here.

Many of these times we are where other diesel trucks are running all night like rest areas etc.

HTH

Melbo
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If it won't go FORCE it ---- if it breaks it needed to be replaced anyway
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Lin
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« Reply #18 on: August 17, 2008, 08:35:25 PM »

Gus,

I have not noticed any serious heat transfer to the bay floor, but then I have never looked for it.  Next time we run it for a while, I will feel around.  You can see in the pictures that the radiator blows out the curb side.  It is sucking air from the driver's side, so maybe all that cross ventilation helps a bit.  I have been thinking of finding some high heat rubber-type stuff to put under the muffler anyway.
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JackConrad
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« Reply #19 on: August 18, 2008, 05:22:37 AM »

   CO detectors should be mandatory.  Not only to monitor possible CO from your generator, but if you are downwind of another RV running a generator (especially without a vertical stack) with your windows open. 
    I saw this happen several years ago 1 dead and 1 with permanent brain damage.  Jack
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Growing Older Is Mandatory, Growing Up Is Optional
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Dreamscape
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« Reply #20 on: August 18, 2008, 07:52:55 AM »

Jack,

Where is the best place to install a carbon monoxide detector?

I do have one, just need to put in the correct location.

Paul
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« Reply #21 on: August 18, 2008, 08:03:40 AM »

With in about 1' of the ceiling. CO is lighter than air and will tend to rise.  On the other hand, LP detectors need to be installed near the floor as LP s heavier than air.  Jack
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Growing Older Is Mandatory, Growing Up Is Optional
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« Reply #22 on: August 18, 2008, 08:11:36 AM »

I installed a Kidde CO sensor on our last trip.  I contacted the company about to height to install it.  They said that CO mixes with the air, so it did not matter.  The only recommendation was that it be at least 6 inches from the ceiling or the floor so that it will not be where air stagnates.  You might want to call the manufacturer of the device you bought since you would want to sue them if it kills you.
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« Reply #23 on: August 18, 2008, 08:38:05 AM »

I'm really confused on where to put CO detectors.  I thought CO was low to the ground so I put a CO detector in the basement and near the gas fireplace.  I have 8 CO detectors in my house, six of which are combo smoke/CO detectors.  All 8 of the CO detectors are hardwired together so any one going off will sound alerts on all of them.

Overkill I know.
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Brian Elfert - 1995 Dina Viaggio 1000 Series 60/B500 - 75% done but usable - Minneapolis, MN
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« Reply #24 on: August 18, 2008, 01:00:38 PM »

"It is important to install the detector in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions. CO detectors can be placed near the ceiling or near the floor as CO is very close to the same density as air"

From Wiki - HTH

P.S. - You want the CO detector in all living areas especially bedrooms - FWIW
« Last Edit: August 18, 2008, 01:26:05 PM by niles500 » Logged

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« Reply #25 on: August 18, 2008, 01:13:32 PM »

HOw about at the same height that you or you family will be breathing?  Maybe the height of your pillow.
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Jim Stewart
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« Reply #26 on: August 18, 2008, 01:24:24 PM »

How about at the same height that you or you family will be breathing?  Maybe the height of your pillow.

I would think you would want to know before it go to where you might breath it if possible.
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Fort Worth, Texas where GOD is so close you don't even need a phone!

1968 GM Bus of unknown model 6V53 engine (aftermarket) converted with house hold items.

Had small engine fire and had no 12 volt system at time of purchase. 
Coach is all 110 w 14KW diesel genrator
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« Reply #27 on: August 19, 2008, 09:56:40 AM »

I guess the makers of this stuff (pipes, tubes) want to be sure its bullet proof before they allow / suggest its use.

I followed the lead from Lin on the flexible exhaust hose.  While its rated at 600 degree max, for continuous use, they limit it to 300 degrees or so.  I called the manufacturer and they said they have had problems with folks that hae used it for generator applications, and did not want to help me any further.

I'm sure LIn has had no problems, and the way both he and Jack have the exhaust set up, seems like a great way to do it.  Use solid pipe from the genset to a point where it goes vertical, then use a larger diameter pipe/ hose so the exhaust is mixed with cooler air, further dropping the temps.

An initial call to Dick Wright's office, they suggested that the exhaust temps would be around 1000 degrees from the 12k diesel genset I bought.  That sounds way high, the exhaust temps from my v8 diesel truck are not that high under full load.

I'm trying to design for a pipe that goes up through the inside of my coach so I don't ever have to hang the vertical pipe.  I'll work all day to aviod a 10 minute repetitive task.  Hanging off the side of the coach, I'd be a lot less concerned about using materials that are not rated for the temp.  going inside, however, I want to be very sure I get the specs and the design correct.

In using my genset, I have measured about 200 degrees, after the muffler, and a 45 minute run time.  It was not under full load, and that could increase the temps significantly.  And thats before any mixing of air in a vertical pipe.
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Jim Stewart
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« Reply #28 on: August 19, 2008, 10:23:18 AM »

Jim,
You have me here.  I have not measured the temps at the exhaust.  I will do that today.  I have not yet used the system in a campground since power is usually available.  Will your type of use require a generator stack often?
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Sojourner
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« Reply #29 on: August 19, 2008, 10:43:36 AM »

Did anyone use IR gun to report the real result? If so if you will, could you tell us what you find in temperature?

That would be interesting to learn what the real temperature is.

Thank you all.

FWIW

Sojourn for Christ, Jerry
« Last Edit: August 19, 2008, 01:38:15 PM by Sojourner » Logged
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