Bus Conversions dot Com Bulletin Board
December 21, 2014, 01:13:30 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: If you had an Online Subscription: It can be read on any computer, iPad, smart phone, or compatible device.
   Home   Help Forum Rules Search Calendar Login Register BCM Home Page Contact BCM  
Pages: 1 2 [All]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: What material for generator stack?  (Read 2811 times)
belfert
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5475




Ignore
« on: August 18, 2008, 11:55:21 AM »

I need to build a generator stack.  What would be the best material to use if starting from scratch?

FRP/fiberglass pipe is probably best, but also spendy.
Logged

Brian Elfert - 1995 Dina Viaggio 1000 Series 60/B500 - 75% done but usable - Minneapolis, MN
Blacksheep
Guest

« Reply #1 on: August 18, 2008, 12:01:52 PM »

What I did was go to Radio Shack and purchased a steel mast. It's 3 pieces but I only use 2. It's telescoping as it fits inside each other. By this feature it can be taken apart and stored very easy! Only thing I had to make was an elbow from the gen exhaust! I also made a tripod that fits to the elbow that holds the pipe upward away from the coach! When the tripod is attached, and the bus airs itself down, the tripod is set. I don't use any hooks, wires, straps, bolts of any kind to attach it (the pipe) to the coach!
Next thing I will do is make me an outer cover to insulate the pipe. It DOES get a little warm to the touch (IF you touch it)! Don't ask me how I know!

Ace
Logged
H3Jim
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1398


1995 Prevost H3-41, series 60, B500 Allison




Ignore
« Reply #2 on: August 18, 2008, 12:40:21 PM »

Ace,
have any pics?  LIke to see waht you did.  I'm still venting under the bus - not good.
Logged

Jim Stewart
El Cajon, Ca.  (San Diego area)

Travel is more than the seeing of sights, it is a change that goes on, deep  and permanent, in the ideas of living.
Lin
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4604

1965 MC-5a




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: August 18, 2008, 12:41:33 PM »

Am I to take it that you did not like my exhaust hose method?
Logged

You don't have to believe everything you think.
makemineatwostroke
Guest

« Reply #4 on: August 18, 2008, 12:48:37 PM »

Check the FMCA archives there are articles on how to build stacks for generators some plain and some advanced or buy one from a rv supply camping world has the system
« Last Edit: August 18, 2008, 12:59:18 PM by makemineatwostroke » Logged
JackConrad
Orange Blossom Special II
Global Moderator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4447


73' MC-8 8V71/HT740 Southwest Florida


WWW
« Reply #5 on: August 18, 2008, 02:06:01 PM »

   We made our stack using an exhaust 90 degree sweep and a short length of exhaust pipe. We slipped this inside a length of 3" PVC Pipe. The exhaust pipe is kept centered by 2 sets of 3 screws.  The exhaust pipe only extends about 2' into the PVC pipe.
    When in use, the hot exhaust gas rising in the pipe pulls ambient air in at the bottom. This serves 2 purposes, it cools the exhaust gaes & pipe as well as diluting the exhaust gases.
   The 3" PVC has a coupling in the middle for easier storage and a clip near the top to hook on our drip rail.  I had most of the neccessary parts laying around in my shop, but it probably would not cost more than $10-15 to make one.  Jack
Logged

Growing Older Is Mandatory, Growing Up Is Optional
Arcadia, Florida, When we are home
http://s682.photobucket.com/albums/vv186/OBS-JC/
JackConrad
Orange Blossom Special II
Global Moderator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4447


73' MC-8 8V71/HT740 Southwest Florida


WWW
« Reply #6 on: August 18, 2008, 02:07:00 PM »

Here is a photo of completed pipe in use.  Jack
Logged

Growing Older Is Mandatory, Growing Up Is Optional
Arcadia, Florida, When we are home
http://s682.photobucket.com/albums/vv186/OBS-JC/
Len Silva
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4086


Angle Parked in a Parallel Universe


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #7 on: August 18, 2008, 03:01:04 PM »

Jack,

You need to paint some red stripes on your pipe!
Logged


Hand Made Gifts

Ignorance is only bliss to the ignorant.
JohnEd
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4571




Ignore
« Reply #8 on: August 18, 2008, 03:06:42 PM »

Jack,

That is a Winner.  Thank you,

John
Logged

"An uneducated vote is a treasonous act more damaging than any treachery of the battlefield.
The price of apathy towards public affairs is to be ruled by evil men." Plato
“We can easily forgive a child who is afraid of the dark; the real tragedy of life is when men are afraid of the light.”
—Pla
Hartley
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1217





Ignore
« Reply #9 on: August 18, 2008, 07:34:48 PM »

Oh and Don't forget to "TUNE" the pipe to kill off the resonance of the exhaust pulses. Or your next door neighbor will be complaining.

There have been some nice looking stacks at the rallys however some have a droning  low frequency hum that tends to fratter nerves 50 feet away although sound very quiet close up. ( Pipe organ style. )

The other thing to keep in mind is that PVC pipe droops and or melts when exposed to 300+ degree heat. You must have the pipe centered perfectly every time.

I used Steel (EMT) conduit for mine with stock elbows and couplers.
It's HOT but quiet. Never did get around to figuring out what to do with 10 feet
of EMT for transport. Usually stuck it inside along the wall or in the trailer.

So I am wierd and CHEAP...Oh wait I am too poor to be cheap!...

Dave....
Logged

Never take a knife to a gunfight!
JimC
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 201




Ignore
« Reply #10 on: August 18, 2008, 08:45:27 PM »

I used two sections of aluminum gutter downspout cut to just over the roof line with an elbow on the bottom, the elbow sits over the generator exhaust. Taken apart they store nicely for transport. Because there is so much room inside the gutter, it stays pretty cool to the touch, much like Jacks, it draws cool air into it from the bottom and it goes up with the exhaust.
Jim
« Last Edit: August 18, 2008, 09:08:02 PM by JimC » Logged

4106 - 8-71/730
Oconomowoc, Wisconsin
between Milwaukee & Madison
H3Jim
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1398


1995 Prevost H3-41, series 60, B500 Allison




Ignore
« Reply #11 on: August 18, 2008, 09:40:12 PM »

how hot does it get.  I am thinking if the pipe was connected directly, and run for hours, that it might get up to300 or 400 degree.  The way Jack has his, it gets that cooling ambient air.  But max temp is pretty important to consider..
Logged

Jim Stewart
El Cajon, Ca.  (San Diego area)

Travel is more than the seeing of sights, it is a change that goes on, deep  and permanent, in the ideas of living.
JackConrad
Orange Blossom Special II
Global Moderator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4447


73' MC-8 8V71/HT740 Southwest Florida


WWW
« Reply #12 on: August 19, 2008, 05:52:17 AM »

how hot does it get.  I am thinking if the pipe was connected directly, and run for hours, that it might get up to300 or 400 degree.  The way Jack has his, it gets that cooling ambient air.  But max temp is pretty important to consider..

First, our exhaust pipe from the generator runs about 15' under the bus, makes a 90 degree sweep and attaches to the muffler which is located just in front of the drive axle on the driver's side of the bus. the output end of the muffler is where we attach the vertical stack. The hottest temperature I have recorded on the metal sweep of the vertical stack is about 140 degrees. The hottest spot on the PVC part of the stack is at the point where the inside length of metal exhaust pipe ends. The outside of the PVC pipe at this point is usually around 100 degrees. I have never seen it hot enough that I could not keep my hand on it.
   I do not know how much hotter it would be if I did not have the 15' run of exhaust before the muffler. I was told that this 15' run of 2" exhaust pipe would help absorb/stop the exhaust pulsations.  The other reason we had for the long run was to try to separate the sources of noise from the generator. With exhaust back by the drive axle, the generator in the OEM condenser compartment, and the radiator/fan in the OEM spare tire compartment, no matter where you stand, you only hear part of the noise from the generator.  Jack
Logged

Growing Older Is Mandatory, Growing Up Is Optional
Arcadia, Florida, When we are home
http://s682.photobucket.com/albums/vv186/OBS-JC/
belfert
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5475




Ignore
« Reply #13 on: August 19, 2008, 05:59:46 AM »

How would schedule 40 or 80 PVC electrical conduit handle the heat?  I am thinking the bell end would be good to couple the two pieces.

I only have about 4 to 6 feet of exhaust pipe including the muffler.
Logged

Brian Elfert - 1995 Dina Viaggio 1000 Series 60/B500 - 75% done but usable - Minneapolis, MN
Ednj
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 997


Ed & Sue Skiba




Ignore
« Reply #14 on: August 19, 2008, 06:03:40 AM »

You need the fresh air space, you know like a double wall stove pipe.
The way Jack has his are just like the ones they sell at rv places.
Logged

MCI-9
Sussex county, Delaware.
See my picture's at= http://groups.yahoo.com/group/busshellconverters/
That's Not Oil Dripping under my Bus, It's Sweat from all that Horsepower.
----- This space for rent. -----
belfert
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5475




Ignore
« Reply #15 on: August 19, 2008, 06:11:24 AM »

You need the fresh air space, you know like a double wall stove pipe.
The way Jack has his are just like the ones they sell at rv places.

I would still use a 3" or 4" PVC conduit for air space.  I am going to make miine basically like Jack's.  I am heading off to buy the 90 for my exhaust right now.
Logged

Brian Elfert - 1995 Dina Viaggio 1000 Series 60/B500 - 75% done but usable - Minneapolis, MN
belfert
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5475




Ignore
« Reply #16 on: August 19, 2008, 06:47:08 AM »

Jack, since your stack just hangs from the gutter, how do you keep it from slipping off if someone bumps, or is that not an issue?

Brian Elfert
Logged

Brian Elfert - 1995 Dina Viaggio 1000 Series 60/B500 - 75% done but usable - Minneapolis, MN
JackConrad
Orange Blossom Special II
Global Moderator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4447


73' MC-8 8V71/HT740 Southwest Florida


WWW
« Reply #17 on: August 19, 2008, 07:39:28 AM »

That has not been a problem so far.  The vertical stack sweep is a snug fit on the muffler outlet.  Jack
Logged

Growing Older Is Mandatory, Growing Up Is Optional
Arcadia, Florida, When we are home
http://s682.photobucket.com/albums/vv186/OBS-JC/
Lin
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4604

1965 MC-5a




Ignore
« Reply #18 on: August 19, 2008, 09:59:00 AM »

To kill a dead horse, as the saying doesn't go,  garage exhaust hose works well, is easy to locate where you want it, is easy to store, and does not get as hot as metal (it does get hot though).  If one does not like the color, there is a rainbow at a paint store.
Logged

You don't have to believe everything you think.
Barn Owl
Roanoke, VA
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2051


PD4106-1063 "Wheezy Bus"




Ignore
« Reply #19 on: August 19, 2008, 07:24:24 PM »

I built one with what I had laying around. EMT compression coupler into a 90 degree EMT bend. The vertical stack was double wall gas pipe that can store easily in the bay. It is easy up/down/storage, and the materials are inexpensive. We use the hose where I work, but it is not cheep and requires an exhaust fan.


Here is an older post where it was covered:

http://www.busconversions.com/bbs/index.php?topic=8541.0
Logged

L. Christley - W3EYE Amateur Extra
Blue Ridge Mountains, S.W. Virginia
It’s the education gained, and the ability to apply, and share, what we learn.
Have fun, be great, that way you have Great Fun!
belfert
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5475




Ignore
« Reply #20 on: August 20, 2008, 11:00:08 AM »

I ended up buying a custom piece of exhaust pipe and a 10 foot 3" PVC pipe to try making a generator exhaust stack.  Total cost was about $30 versus $90 or so for the Genturi.
Logged

Brian Elfert - 1995 Dina Viaggio 1000 Series 60/B500 - 75% done but usable - Minneapolis, MN
BJ
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 144




Ignore
« Reply #21 on: August 21, 2008, 11:03:16 PM »

camping world has a exhaust stack that is engineered with air space for cooling and suction for around $100.00  looks real professional to me and works.....
Logged
belfert
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5475




Ignore
« Reply #22 on: August 22, 2008, 02:06:06 PM »

The Camping World version is $150 now.  The cheapest I have found the Gen-turi for is $130 plus shipping.

My version is $30.  If it doesn't work and melts I buy a different type of pipe for another $10.  I'm almost certain it won't the generator as I am using the same principle as the Gen-Turi.
Logged

Brian Elfert - 1995 Dina Viaggio 1000 Series 60/B500 - 75% done but usable - Minneapolis, MN
JackConrad
Orange Blossom Special II
Global Moderator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4447


73' MC-8 8V71/HT740 Southwest Florida


WWW
« Reply #23 on: August 22, 2008, 03:43:29 PM »

The Camping World version is $150 now.  The cheapest I have found the Gen-turi for is $130 plus shipping.

My version is $30.  If it doesn't work and melts I buy a different type of pipe for another $10.  I'm almost certain it won't the generator as I am using the same principle as the Gen-Turi.

The one I made has lasted 8 years so far and it still working great.  Since I had mosr of the parts laying around in my shop, i doubt if I have more than $10.00 invested.  As with yours, mine also uses the same principal as the $100 one.  Jack
Logged

Growing Older Is Mandatory, Growing Up Is Optional
Arcadia, Florida, When we are home
http://s682.photobucket.com/albums/vv186/OBS-JC/
Pages: 1 2 [All]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.18 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!