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Author Topic: Front tire blowout - handling procedures  (Read 5468 times)
plyonsMC9
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« on: August 25, 2008, 07:39:41 AM »

I have pulled a section of a thread from the MCI Busnuts as I thought it presented some great safety information.  Maybe we could get some input here.  I would sure appreciate knowing more in this area - it looks like this kind of information could save a life ( or lives ).  Don't know the 'netiquette', so am just going to grab a snippit & see where that takes this.

----->
I second Pete's comments.

Just keep the bus straight and in your lane. No accelerator pedal and no
brakes at first. And forget the emergency brake, as it has no
sensitivity/feedback like the air treadle. The added drag of the failed
front tire will provide significant drag and (therefore, braking) to slow
the bus without any driver "help" with the brake pedal. Assuming it is a
right front tire, expect that you will need to use some left-turn wheel
steering to counteract the drag of the failed right front tire.

Below 30mph, very slight brake pedal action can be applied, but forget about
the screaming passengers and noise and just stay focussed on keeping the bus
straight and in the lane. The passengers are not going to help you and
become a distraction that you need to "tune out" until stopped. Expect some
front wheel-well damage and also "tune out" the noise of the tire shredding
itself to pieces and flapping around in the wheel well. Sheet metal to
replace the wheel well panels is cheap, human lives are priceless.

Remember, you are now trying to stop a 40 ft bus with only 3 corners having
correctly functioning brakes. The use of any brake pedal will exert braking
to only the one good front tire, which can easily overcome the front
steering (even with power steering, the forces are tremendous). Assuming
it is a right front tire that has failed, the use of any braking pedal
action will now try to turn the bus left. If you are already pulling the
steering wheel left to resist the drag on the right front corner, the sudden
use of brakes will abruptly make the bus try to turn left, setting you up to
either spin out or roll the bus, depending on load, pavement conditions, and
wind. (and it's usually roll the bus, due to the CG and aerodynamics of a
bus).

Been there, done that.

Lonnie

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« Reply #1 on: August 25, 2008, 07:54:32 AM »

Interesting,  I had always assumed that the braking force would be applied more to the blown tire, at least for the first few seconds until the tread comes off.

I have also heard that you should actually accelerate at first to help maintain control, then slow to a stop with minimal braking (assuming it's safe to do so.)

I had a right front blowout on my 4104 at speed and just coasted to a stop, a complete non incident.  It was a sidewall that went and I didn't have any tread damage to the wheel well.
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« Reply #2 on: August 25, 2008, 08:14:54 AM »

I definitely agree this topic needs some attention and input from drivers (especially professional drivers) that have been through it.  It would also make a great seminar at one or more rallies.

Thankfully, I've only been through blow outs in cars.  So I'm not an expert on it.  But what about engine/transmission braking (jakes, retarder or just downshifting) since that would only apply drag to the rears.
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« Reply #3 on: August 25, 2008, 08:26:05 AM »

There was a video link posted a while back that explained the various forces acting on a vehicle going down the road. It also explained why (in the case of a blow out) the best first action is to accelerate.


I've had a couple of front blowouts. The main thing to do is make gradual changes. Sudden over-corrections are what causes the most damage.

What I did 2 months ago while pulling a 32' trailer at 60 mph on a divided hi-way & the front tire blew. (I had checked the air pressure & given it a visual inspection 15 miles prior to the incident.)
Got a good grip on the wheel with both hands.
Since the blown tire is pulling you into a decreasing radius turn, correct only enough to make it a constant radius,
then correct to a straight line,
then correct to parallel to your desired path, (time elapsed ~2 seconds)
Then check your mirrors & steer to where you need to be.

While I was doing the steering corrections, I gradually eased off the throttle.
Once I felt I had regained control of the vehicle, I gradually eased on the brakes to safely stop.


Being able to ignore the noise from the tire & passangers helped a lot!

Being able to make calculated adjustments is critical. Making rash, abrupt changes will only increase your chances of injury.


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« Reply #4 on: August 25, 2008, 08:48:04 AM »

Last year I had the tread come off (firestone) the left front tire of my F-250 pickup.  I was doing 80 when I felt some serious vibration.  I started to slowly slow down  when the entire tread came off and wrapped itself around both the rest of the tire, and the front axle. It was like locking up just that wheel for a short time until the wrapped tread stabilized itself.

In about 1/10 of a second, the locked up tread pulled me over 1/2 lane to the left. I kept a steady hand, had my foot off the gas and gently steered back into my lane, then slowly over several more lanes to the side of the freeway.  I was really glad that raffic was light and there was not anyone in the left lane, or I would have hit them.

When I bought the truck, they had said the trouble with Firestone tires was only for the ones on the Explorer, and the heavier duty ones for the F-250 were perfectly good tires.  I changed the tire, drove straight to Disocunt tire and had all new Michelins put on.  I will never have another firestone tire on a vehcile I own.  At the speeds I drive, I could have easily been killed.
« Last Edit: August 25, 2008, 09:29:22 AM by H3Jim » Logged

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« Reply #5 on: August 25, 2008, 09:10:25 AM »

What a strange coincidence, the tire that blew on me was a firestone. According to the sidewall information, it was the appropriate tire for my K2500 suburban & wasn't overloaded either. I didn't get the benefit of any warning vibration either.  Sad

Yes, I did a bit of lane shifting too, but since I was in the right lane when the right side tire blew, I was lucky. Cool
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« Reply #6 on: August 25, 2008, 10:15:47 AM »

OK back in '06 Fourth of July week end dad & I helped a friend / competitor drive 3 bus loads of Hindu Indians out to Lubbock, TX for a wedding. We'd just fueled and made a driver change (sotra, I went from driving a Renaissance to an H3-45 & a new log page! some relief! LOL!) somewhere just east of Abilene, TX. (to long ago to remember exactly) Anyway I was following Sam & Bobby, (Bobby owned all 3 buses) Sam was driving while Bobby rested. And dad & Gary were behind me, dad driving and Gary resting.
About 30-40 miles down I-20 at MM 260 there was huge sound of an explosion, and the front end started to shimmy. I knew instantly I'd blown a steer tire, but didn't know which one! Now we were running 75 +/- (speedo didn't work) and I was in the left lane passing a little car that had the windows down. I looked in the mirror and saw the car exit the hwy at 65-70 mph across the grass strip onto the service/access rd, and then stop. SO I pretty well figured it was the right one, and it only took a slight second to assure my self of that the way it was pulling. Well I looked in the mirror again and saw dad had backed way off and was splitting the lanes and had his hazard lights on. So I knew I had a wide open area around me. Up ahead Sam just kept flying on down the road, no noticing what was going on behind him. Well I just turned on the jake brake and just let the bus "coast down to a stop" by feathering throttle pedal and letting the jake ease me down. Once I had it slowed down enough I knew I could keep it under control I eased on the brake while slowly easing over onto the shoulder. But not to hard on the brake or all the way onto the should until I was almost completely stopped. Then as I set the brake and opened the door I got out and looked!
OH not pretty, but it was safely off the road and nobody injured! Several trucks went by honking and giving me a thumbs up sign. (I guess they'd figured out dad was holding a safe zone for me, and were impressed I'd kept it under control!) Dad and Gary came up as all my passangers got of hugging and praising me (I guess they were praising me I couldn't understand 95% of it, but the smiles and hugs made me feel like they were!)
Dad just looked at it and said "good job son, I knew you were in for a ride when I heard it. But then when the tread came out from under you and over us, I was pretty worried!" Gary was still white as a ghost and speechless! I asked what was wrong, and he said. "I just got to sleep and I heard KABOOOM like a shot gun going off in my ear, and I open my eyes and see a tire flying at us!"
Then I asked hey has Sam & Bobby stopped? Ah good question, dad called Bobby and asked if they knew we were missing. Bobby was obviously asleep, and said "do what? Where ya at?" Then he told Sam to pull over, and as Sam was pulling over he looked at Bobby and said "Hey I don't see them other two buses anywhere in sight!" Bobby said "yeah Bryce blew a tire 15 miles back!"
So they did a U turn across the grass strip onto the service road and came back up it to where we were. Bobby had been on the phone calling everybody about getting a tire truck out there, and was having no luck (he has a national account with someone). SO when they  got back we decided to split my load between the other 2 buses and Bobby would stay with the one that was broke down. Bobby finally got a tire service out of Lubbock to agree to come out. We went on and about 3 hrs later Bobby came in.

Later that night after we'd gotten some rest we sat around at dinner talking about it. I had looked the ires over when we swapped, and it'd looked fine. And Bobby said it wasn't 2 months old. Sam said when he'd "pre-triped it before leaving Troy (Bobby's place) he had used a gauge on all the tires because they didn't look right, but that they were all OK!" And as particular as Sam is I do believe him.

So #1) Stay off the brake
#2) Stay calm & focused
#3) ease to a safe place and stop gradually.

FWIW Grin  BK  Grin
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« Reply #7 on: August 25, 2008, 12:22:06 PM »

Blow out video is on Michelin somewhere, IIRC.

Blow out is a non-event.

The test drivers at Michelin do it all the time, and there's nothing to it.
If you had the chance to try out a few, you'd call it a non-event too.

Only your panic will make it newsworthy.

The noise and uncertainty will trigger reactions that will put us in the rhubarb.

If the vehicle starts out of control, the driver has done it, not the vehicle. It wants to continue down the highway, the driver did something to give the higher drag blown tire an advantage to pull.

Reactions are your enemy, because they naturally involve lifting throttle, applying the brake pedal and/or sudden motions of steering and/or pedals to make stuff go away. Sudden lift throttle with the jakes/retarder on, and that'll start something. And how many leave the jake/retarder switch turned on all the time going down the road?

The Michelin test drivers don't...

happy coaching!
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« Reply #8 on: August 25, 2008, 12:28:02 PM »

This is a great topic!

It needs to either be a sticky or put in the Help Section. Somewhere where it's easy to find.

I have never had this happen in a car, pickup or our Eagle. So I can't add anything but "Great Information".

All of us could learn something, I know I just did....Don't buy Firestone Tires for a starter.  Roll Eyes

Paul
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« Reply #9 on: August 25, 2008, 12:32:37 PM »

Generally its true, a blowout can be a non event if the driver knows what they are doing.  I was surprised when my truck did jerk over a half lane faster than the blink of an eye, and before I even had time to react.  But it wasn't something I did, as I am an experienced driver and I know how to handle emergencies.  

It was the tire tread that totally separated from the caracass in one peice.  When it wrapped around both the tire and the axle, it effectively put the brakes on  momentarily.  The actual tire did not blow out, the carcass still had air pressure in it.

So it can and did happen that a tire event can be life threatening no matter your skill.  NO MORE FIRESTONES!!

Keep in mind that these (Kyle4501 too) were light truck tires, I'm told that the truck and bus tires are completely different, and are very good tires.  That may very well be, but I sure am gun shy of the brand.
« Last Edit: August 25, 2008, 09:59:41 PM by H3Jim » Logged

Jim Stewart
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« Reply #10 on: August 25, 2008, 04:36:49 PM »

Here is the link to the movie on blowouts

http://www.michelinrvtires.com/michelinrv/toolbox/videos-demos.jsp#The_Critial_Factor

Click on "Critical Factor"

Ray D
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« Reply #11 on: August 25, 2008, 05:58:09 PM »


Hi all;
       I have a MC-7. I too had a blowout on the front.  In what seemed
       like a loooong split second, I remembered to set the park break.
       Even at 60mph, I  had no problem handeling the bus. Earlier I had
       read the instructions in the Greyhound Drivers book that said to
       do this in an emergency.
                                     Happy driving  - - - Merle.  Shocked
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« Reply #12 on: August 25, 2008, 08:20:35 PM »

So far, it looks like the only thing that can cause problem with a front tire blowout is panic.  e.g., stepping / stomping on the brakes, jerking the steering wheel, etc.. Is that correct?  Different approaches seem to have worked: Jakes to slow down the bus, emergency brakes, and just letting the bus slow down, then gently applying the brakes. 

Thanks to all who have contributed so far, this is really helpful.

Best Regards, Phil
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H3Jim
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« Reply #13 on: August 25, 2008, 09:51:47 PM »

Gee Phil, no, not the only thing that can cause a problem is driver panic. If the tire itself actually comein contact with a both a stationary object and the rim, it can cause you  severe issues.  I would say 99% of the time you are correct, but it can and did happen to me where there was not anything I could have done differently other than not have Firestone tires.
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« Reply #14 on: August 26, 2008, 06:51:35 AM »

Good point.  Your story was eye-opening for me as after reading it, I tried to imagine what it would feel like to have that tire rubber wrapping the stationary object. Two hands on the wheel helped at that point I'm guessing.  That, and you never know when "something" may happen.

Thanks again Jim!!
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« Reply #15 on: August 26, 2008, 08:21:36 AM »

I guess it's possible that a blow out can take out a brake line or an airbag, further complicating things.
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« Reply #16 on: August 26, 2008, 08:37:24 AM »

Good morning,okee dokee thus far have heard pretty much every that could go wrongand all of it true.The main thing to remember is to remain in control of 1)the bus2)the bus(which is the hardest thing).this was always first and foremost in my mind when comin home with mine for the first time.I 've had front tire blow outs on every thing from my Pov to a Heavy eguiptment transporter(HET) loaded with an M-1A2 main battle tank @67tons plus the Het @22 and a half tons plus the trailer,well you get the idea of of the total tonage involved here.traveling from aberdeen proving grounds maryland back to ft Dix New Jersey the left front tire was punctered from debris on the jersey turn pike ,now traveling @ a speed of 60 mph in the right lane in inclement weather you can imagine this to be a handful(it was)thank god no one was hurtthis was the equal of walking a bull stud on a leash and it deciding he wants to go where it wants.Eventually got it under control WE thought right before lack of traction took over.now I had two options at the time try to keep it on the road and possibly(more than likely)end up runnin over traffic which had slowed up in front of me or take it off the road down a short embankment into a farm field,I chose the latter which in this case saved numerous lives (man what a ride).

       The point i'm trying to make here is to always remain vigilant and never take things for granted .There are many factors involved in how a controled recovery is going to turn out none of which willever be the same ie,type of blow out the side of the blow out ,road conditions ,wind,are you traveling up hill down hill in a curve,direction of the curve and most important (to me any way)your frame of mind.distractions are a big factor as mention in the previous posts passengers can cause you to blow it also ,just remain focused .I have driven heavy equiptment around the globe and after being shot at while driving have kinda become desensitized to distractions while driving but despite all this I still always have remained vigilant.

       I call this the radar effect being an ex tanker in the army the lives of your crew and those in your tank squad depend on the vigilance of all to spot the enemy before he spots you first.And have adopted this tactic driving here in the states ,constantly scanning my path,not for some one trying shoot at ya but other drivers ,road hzards all lying in wait to take you out you get the idea .Every thing depends on you and how much you can dictate situations will turn out.first and again formost your equiptment,you dictate how reliable your equiptment is and whether it is road worthy and compramize should not be an option Ever!

      For me this has always been my curse,never being able to compromise.every trip I have ever taken with Cheryl I could never be able to tell you in detail the sights we have driven past ,only the road .Even taken road trips on our harley(road glide)it's always the road.My problem is I only trust a hand ful of people I know to be behind the wheel while i'm on board playing the tourist role.when ever my wife and I are traveling together I drive that's the rule and has never ever been open for discussion and Cheryl will agree ,she would'nt have it any other way.I'm glad this tire issue has been brought up ,things like this are an asset to the bus nut young or old ,thanks


      welcome to my world

         Van
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skipn
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« Reply #17 on: August 26, 2008, 08:52:33 AM »


  Handling a blow out starts before the actual event.

  drive with 2 hands on the wheel

 please..........

Skip
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« Reply #18 on: August 26, 2008, 09:18:46 AM »

    When I had to take the Emergency Vehicle Operation Course (EVOC), one of the things they stressed which I always try to practive when driving any vehicle, is to constantly keep you eyes moving, scanning for possible hazards (other vehicles, road conditions, traffic, etc.) and planning "escape routes" from these potential hazards. Also as mentioned, ALWAYS DRIVE WITH 2 HANDS ON THE WHEEL! 
    One other thing I try to do is manitain a "comfort zone" of enough space around me to give me space to react if something should happen.  Jack
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« Reply #19 on: August 26, 2008, 10:43:16 AM »

Fortunately, I have never had a front blowout.  On my past motorhome and bus, I had a installed front end stabilizer systems that, aside from steadying the steering in wind and gust situations, were supposed to help in case of blowouts.  I do not even know if they have them for this bus.
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« Reply #20 on: August 26, 2008, 11:15:01 AM »

The video is interesting.  If anyone has the presents of mind to put their foot in it when something drastic suddenly happens without any warning they are better than me.  The first and natural reaction is to lift until you have some idea what is happening.  According to the video that is too late to use the throttle, which I must admit is totally counter intuitive for me anyway.

The drivers in the video knew what was going to happen, they may not have known exactly when, but they knew it was coming.  I try to stay vigilant when driving, even more so when driving big or heavy.  Unless you are thinking blow out every five seconds I think you would be hard pressed to react with throttle.  If things went real bad, and you said you applied more throttle I think a prosecutor would ask why, jury too.

As others have said, don't do anything drastic, the most important rule is to drive the the rig.  If there is a funny noise, drive the rig.  If there is a very loud noise, drive the rig.  If your tire and wheel are passing you, drive the rig. (Happened twice to me, non bus.) If there are flames coming out of the bedroom, drive the rig.  If you have bounced off the guard rail or another vehicle or two, you still have to try to drive the rig.  Never give up until it is stopped!

Back in the bad ole days, when tires were less reliable, and I had less $ for good ones, I had a few blow outs.  As I remember it the rear tires were more of a heart stopper than the fronts.  When it was the fronts a judicial amount of brake helps offset the drag on the side with the blown tire.  But, memory fades.  Just glad that tires in general are better these days. 

Rather than worrying about blowing one of my tires, I am more concerned about dodging the other clowns that might blow one beside or in front of me. YMMV

Don 4107
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« Reply #21 on: August 26, 2008, 11:40:36 AM »

I wonder if it is the daredevil in me that enables me to keep my foot in it as all heck is breaking loose?   Grin  Grin  Grin


When you sum up all the different force vectors acting on a vehicle during a blowout, applying power (only long enough to regain control) makes perfect sense . You aren't trying to gain speed here, & you'll only need less than a couple of seconds before you regain steerability & then you should be easing off. If you can't regain steering control in a few seconds, it is my opinion you are over correcting.
 
I guess I should add that having steering control doesn't necessarily mean it is going where you want it to, but rather you are more than just a spectator & have some influence over the direction of travel.

Some times after a blow out, you will find that you are simply traveling too fast to be able to have the normal influence on direction of travel. That is where YOU, as the driver, will have to determine how soon you need to stop before things get worse. Sometimes, coasting is best. Sometimes, gradually increasing brake application is the best. You gotta decide that for yourself when it happens.

I do believe some are better suited to handle this than others. Just look at the number of crashes caused by someone over-correcting when they run off on the shoulder. . . .


Hey, maybe all the practice I've had at getting back on the road is what helped? ? ? ?  Shocked
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« Reply #22 on: August 26, 2008, 12:55:26 PM »

I firmly believe that the only reason that I am in one piece is growing up with a go-kart.  Lived on gravel roads and with the kart you were always sideways.  Just became second nature.  Later in life that got me out of some really dumb situations I put myself into.  Oh to be young and bullet proof again! 

Some time on a kart and slick track or gravel lot should be part of driver's training for everyone. There would be a lot less cars rolled into the ditch. 

Ten or fifteen years ago on a trip with the boys we stopped at a go-kart track in Oregon.  They had another track that had some kind of coating on it and they added water to make it REAL slick.  Great training and fun too!! 

Don
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van
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« Reply #23 on: August 26, 2008, 01:43:15 PM »

This is a great topic that should be brought up every so often.Question for our fellow bus nuts who drive bus proffesionaly,what is the top speed that you would travel with passengers aboard?My trip back east to cedar rapids I have encountered at least two busses hauling customers traveling in excess of 80 mph ,what say you about that?I my self thought it very irresponsible and down right neglegent putting people at risk.I myself like to haul butt when traffic ,weather blah blah blah permits ,even on my harley I like to travel at around 90 but would never do it with any one on board or where it puts any one at risk.


           passengers are requested to refrain from screaming
                          VAN
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« Reply #24 on: August 26, 2008, 01:45:50 PM »

Van, there are drivers & then there are steering wheel holders . . . . . .
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« Reply #25 on: August 26, 2008, 01:59:39 PM »

Oh,one more thing I think was not toached on was the issue of having a steer tire go while on cruise control,somthing else to consider.

               VAN
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« Reply #26 on: August 26, 2008, 02:55:36 PM »

Some time on a kart and slick track or gravel lot should be part of driver's training for everyone. There would be a lot less cars rolled into the ditch. 
Ten or fifteen years ago on a trip with the boys we stopped at a go-kart track in Oregon.  They had another track that had some kind of coating on it and they added water to make it REAL slick.  Great training and fun too!! 
Don 4107

  Years ago, our Fire Department flooded an abandoned parking lot with water from the fire hydrant, added a bunch of dish detergent and turned us loose (one at a time) to drive a van type ambulance through a course made with traffic cones. Object: quickest time without hitting any cones.  Boy, was that fun. Great training too. You really learn how to feather the throttle as well as the brake while using the steering to control the vehicle. 
  I also spent many days racing Go Karts on a dirt track back in the early 60s. As well as trying to be Joey Chitwood in an old 49 Ford sedan in my grandfather's alfalfa field.  We destroyed that alfalfa crop. I never realized how much dirt is in the carpeting of a car until I put it on it's roof by driving one side up a ramp to try driving on the 2 left wheels.
  I think all these and other similar experiences helped me develop a feel for handling a vehicle in emergency situations.  Jack
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« Reply #27 on: August 26, 2008, 06:12:29 PM »

OK some clarification here! When I said I used the JAKE brake when I had my steer tire blow out at 75 + mph. I did not immediately hit the JAKE, but only after regaining my composure after thinking I'd been suicide bombed and sure I was in complete controll of the bus. Then I allowed the bus to gradually bring it self down to around 50 mph(again the speedo did not work) before turning the JAKE on and using my right foot to "feather " the JAKE on and off lightly. I did not just throw the JAKE on and say WHOA BIG FELLOW WHOA! FWIW!

Now I did not mention other times I have had a steer tire blow out as they were not in a bus! But I have had several before.

The first on I ever remember having was on a 10 spd racing bike I had back in high school! Now it's not a bus, but scary none the less going downhill on a bicycle at 25-30 mph and have the front tire blow on ya. Especially when there are other riders beside and behind you!

I also had one at 65 mph on a '65 RUSTANG I had with a hopped up 302 BOSS in it! (ruined the front fender, knocked out the left headlight bucket, took out part of the grill, and wasted the front bumper! And that was strictly tire damage from the tread "BLOWING OFF" the tire still held air, and I limped it 2 miles to a phone (before cell phones! LOL!) because I didn't have a spare!
Also had one come OFF the rear on the same car once while street racing (bad old habit) that had not been properly tightened that afternoon when "new rims" were installed! Boy I coulda killed that idiot that didn't get that wheel tightened! Oh wait a minute I almost did kill myself! (Or could have anyway!)

I've also had them blow out on several semi trucks but those really were non-events! Just used the trailer hand brake to gradually slow it to a stop while keeping the weight off the steer axle by doing so!

I guess the only time a steer tire blow out had anything at all to be of a concern to me was several times while armature stock car racing where it'd happen while pushing into a turn or fig 8 cross over to hard! Then it was crunch time, but in a controlled environment!FWIW! Grin  BK  Grin
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« Reply #28 on: August 27, 2008, 10:41:24 AM »

Since there have been a number of bus crashes in the last few years from steer tire blowouts, including but not limited to, coaches from MCI and most recently, Prevost, more and more operators are installing Tyron Tire Blowout Protection.  This is a technology which is decades proven and used by police and fire departments worldwide.  It is pretty much standard equipment on Newell coaches, for example.  Tyron is a steel brace which covers the drop center of the steer wheel which keeps rubber between the rim and road after the blowout.  Steering is maintained. 
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« Reply #29 on: August 27, 2008, 12:58:27 PM »

Since there have been a number of bus crashes in the last few years from steer tire blowouts, including but not limited to, coaches from MCI and most recently, Prevost, more and more operators are installing Tyron Tire Blowout Protection.  This is a technology which is decades proven and used by police and fire departments worldwide.  It is pretty much standard equipment on Newell coaches, for example.  Tyron is a steel brace which covers the drop center of the steer wheel which keeps rubber between the rim and road after the blowout.  Steering is maintained. 

Your video shows blowouts without treads leaving the tire.  Over the years, I have had 2 blowouts (fortunately both were rear tires), but in both cases, the treads separated from the tire. What would be left to remain between the road and the wheel?   Jack
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« Reply #30 on: August 27, 2008, 10:29:43 PM »

If you have ever driven circle track, when you blow a tire, it is the most normal thing in the world to punch the throttle. If you haven't, the 11 inch drop on 1100 tires and 12 in drop on 1200 rubber will give you a real challenge. The object is to pretend nothing is wrong and just keep steering and you will be fine.
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« Reply #31 on: August 28, 2008, 04:56:17 AM »

I've got the same as Jack. All of my blow outs have been catastrophic tire failures. No, they weren't all firestones.  Wink

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« Reply #32 on: August 28, 2008, 07:08:41 AM »

Here are some real time left front blowouts, Donít watch if you have a weak stomach.
The people in the cars had no chance, 1 video is a broken steering wheel. 

http://uk.truveo.com/The-Italy-highway-crash-in-slomo-short-aftermath/id/945651994

http://uk.truveo.com/Massive-Fiery-Crash/id/965915136

http://uk.truveo.com/Drive-cam-captures-horriffic-accident-involving/id/2030201823

http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=c2321db6f9

http://uk.truveo.com/Steering-wheel-failure-causes-this-bus-crashing/id/2305766990

http://uk.truveo.com/DriveCam-Bus-Crash-Front-View/id/1739788308

http://uk.truveo.com/Bus-Crashes-Into-Car-On-Highway/id/1313364700

http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=49d_1176116615
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