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Author Topic: 110v. Auxiliary Air Compressor  (Read 1400 times)
NEO/Russ
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« on: August 26, 2008, 07:26:42 AM »

For those of you that have an 110v. auxiliary compressor to charge the air system before firing off the noise maker, here is a plumbing question.  Do you plumb the output from the compressor into your dryer (if you have one) or into your wet tank?  And in either case I would presume a "T" fitting approach; so do you install a check valve or at least a shut off so a minor failure of the compressor system wouldn't knock-out your suspension, or worse, brakes?

I know Sean has a compressor on his Neoplan and I think a few others do also and any experiences would be helpful, thanks, Russ
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Well no longer a bus nut, but over the years I learned a lot here and still come back to see what I can apply to the conversion of my KW T2000 for hauling my Teton fifth wheeler.
JackConrad
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« Reply #1 on: August 26, 2008, 07:58:17 AM »

Russ,
   We installed our air compressor in the engine compartemnet (where the OEM AC compressor was located).  We plumbed the compressor into the bus system with a T on top of the ping tank. This is the first place the compressed air goes from either compressor, bus or aux and before the drier. We did install a one way check valve to prevent bus air from coming back into aux. compressor
   We connect the aux compresser at the T with a standard quick connect fitting. Compressor is also held in place by a bracket with a couple large wing nuts.  This allows the compressor to be easily removed from the bus for other uses. Just our way, YMMV  Jack
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Growing Older Is Mandatory, Growing Up Is Optional
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« Reply #2 on: August 26, 2008, 09:38:26 AM »

Yup, what Jack said. 

Mine goes onto the "drain daily" line with a regular airline quick disconnect and a manual valve.
Not automated yet.
Compressor lives in whichever bay it ends up in, run an airline outside.

Best that the aux compressor's air goes someplace that is regularly intended to have condensation, and gets drained off periodically.

Direct to suspension without facility for collecting and draining the moisture may come back to haunt the designer!

happy coaching!
buswarrior
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Lee Bradley
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« Reply #3 on: August 26, 2008, 09:48:04 AM »

I would give consideration to keeping the auxiliary compressor in a clean area as they generally don't have a great air cleaner.
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Lin
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« Reply #4 on: August 26, 2008, 10:39:43 AM »

When we got the bus, it had a quick disconnect on the bottom of the filter in the engine room.  I have since added a gauge with a Shraider valve.  Before, I used a quick disconnect made with two male ends stuck together.  Hey, live and let live.  Now, I either do that or use a tire filler that clips in place.
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« Reply #5 on: August 26, 2008, 12:20:45 PM »

I would give consideration to keeping the auxiliary compressor in a clean area as they generally don't have a great air cleaner.

Lee,
  I thought about that, but except in an emergency such as a bus air compressor failure, the aux compressor does not run when bus is moving or engine running. I felt running the compressor in the "cold" stationary engine compartment would be no worse than running it on job sites operating air nailers (what it did in a previous life). I may look at modifying the air filter to use an automotive type just to be on the safe side.
  I agree it would probably not be a good thing to use it while driving down the road (except in an emergency.  Jack
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« Reply #6 on: August 26, 2008, 12:27:38 PM »

I found that a 1/2 hp air compressor gave the best balance of speed and easy starting on the MSW inverter. It takes around 10 minutes to air up our coach.

Tom Caffrey
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Tom Caffrey PD4106-2576
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« Reply #7 on: August 26, 2008, 06:58:09 PM »

I was fortunate in that the PO had an auxilliary set of valves and airtank installed up front in the cubby under the drivers compartment for operating the air-adjustable dining table and passengers foot rest. I mounted my compressor in there and plumbed it into the existing lines so it feeds into the auxilliary airtank and drier. There was 110v up there for a squirrel cage fan that moves air over the AC condensors mounted on the passenger's side. Lucky me- Grin
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