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Author Topic: TV antenna help  (Read 1596 times)
luvrbus
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« on: October 03, 2008, 09:50:37 AM »

Do you guys know where I can buy a Wintenna model 720 the only places I can locate one is England or Prevost and I am not going to pay Prevost prices for a antenna   help please thanks and good luck
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boogiethecat
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« Reply #1 on: October 03, 2008, 09:52:39 AM »

I'm going to ask a stupid question here... with broadcast TV going completely away shortly, why would you want  a TV antenna?
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1962 Crown
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WEC4104
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« Reply #2 on: October 03, 2008, 09:58:13 AM »

Broadcast TV going completely away shortly? What makes you think that?

I can think of several reasons to have an antenna:

1) Many campgrounds, and virtually all boondocking locations have no cable TV available.
2) Satellite reception requires either a teadious set up procedure or a big$ tracking type system. On top of that you have monthly service fees, and possibly monthly equipment charges.
3) Over the air digital broadcasts still provide the best picture with the least compression of the HD signals. Better than cable, better that satellite services
4) Depending on the type of antenna and proximity to the broadcast location, you can watch the networks while rolling, something you can't do with cable.
5) Feeding the signal to a second TV in the bedroom is simple with an antenna. With a satellite system it becomes more complex. Either both TVs must watch the same show, or a second receiver (at extra cost) is required. Even with the second receiver, you may run into issues if two shows are on different satellites. Possible need for multiple LNBFs, etc.
6) Satellite reception requires an unobstructured light-of-sight to the bird.  One misplaced tree branch at your assigned campsite could mean no satellite service during your stay.
7) Even if you do have cable or sat, having an antenna provides redundancy. Redundant systems are good.
Cool Buy the antenna and the rest is free.

 
« Last Edit: October 03, 2008, 10:23:22 AM by WEC4104 » Logged

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luvrbus
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« Reply #3 on: October 03, 2008, 09:59:43 AM »

boogie, it's also for the radio and I don't want to try and patch the hole, reroute, plus relocate my radio wiring   good luck
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belfert
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« Reply #4 on: October 03, 2008, 10:00:14 AM »

Broadcast TV is NOT going away.  They are simply converting from analog to digital signals.

I've seen the same TV running on analog and on digital with convertor and the digital was ten times better.  Now, this was in the middle of a major metro area so the same results may not happen in a rural area.
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Brian Elfert - 1995 Dina Viaggio 1000 Series 60/B500 - 75% done but usable - Minneapolis, MN
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« Reply #5 on: October 03, 2008, 10:32:15 AM »

Back to your original question... source for the antenna....

If the Wintenna 720 and Wintenna 720A are a close enough match, here is a dealer in Massachusetts with on-line order support:

http://www.youdoitelectronics.com/id938_wintenna_720a__classic_.htm
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« Reply #6 on: October 03, 2008, 06:42:44 PM »

Don't get that!  I have used the "Winegard" antenna for 18 years.  I have zero experience with anything else but I am completely sold on mine.  Had two actually.  The thing rotates and will get long distance stations with some slewing.  It has some rinky dink RF amp that really does work.  The thing cranks up to get away from the roof of the coach and if you turn on the TV before you raise it you will see how the signal increases strength as it moves away from the roof.  I have been places where I had to lower it only a few inches to get a perfect pic.  It is very directional and that means "gain".  It is raised, lowered and slewed from inside the coach.  The fixed "bat wing" cannot compare in total performance but mine cannot be operated while in motion either.  Talk to others before committing.

HTH,

John
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Dreamscape
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« Reply #7 on: October 04, 2008, 03:18:15 AM »

Sheesh, I thought those boomerang ant went out with the rotary dial phone! Grin

I have one on our Eagle and it does OK locally, that is if it can find a signal. I have no idea how old it is, it was on the coach when we bought it.

FWIW,

Paul
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luvrbus
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« Reply #8 on: October 04, 2008, 03:30:28 AM »

Paul, it's not for my bus I don't know if they still use the antenna or not but for a 1998 H-41 Prevost that is the antenna it had from the factory for TV and FM radio and for whatever reason the 720 is hard to find.        Good luck
« Last Edit: October 04, 2008, 03:39:48 AM by luvrbus » Logged
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