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Author Topic: Should I clean fuel tank after sitting 2 1/2 years?  (Read 1305 times)
belfert
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« on: June 18, 2006, 06:58:09 PM »

After reading about the Van Hool fuel filter problems, I began to think about my bus.  My bus apparently sat anywhere from 2.5 to 3 years or more.  The title was issued to the bus dealer 2.5 years before I bought the bus, so it sat at least that long.  (Titles can takes weeks or months to be issued,)

Do I need to worry about the condition of my fuel tank?  The tank was very low on fuel when I left the dealer.  I had the fuel filter changed beofer I left for my 1600 mile trip home.  I will change the fuel filter before my big trip this fall and bring a spare.

Brian Elfert
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gumpy
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« Reply #1 on: June 18, 2006, 08:20:39 PM »

1600 miles. That's at least 2 tanks of fuel. You've already cleaned it  Cheesy

Change your filters before your trip west this fall. Keep the tank full to prevent condensation in the tank. Put some #1 in before winter, or conditioner.  Carry at least one set of spare fuel filters and know how to install them.

You're good to go.

craig
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Craig Shepard
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« Reply #2 on: June 19, 2006, 06:01:09 AM »

When I bought my bus (which I no longer have Cry), it sat idle for nearly 5 years with fuel in the tank.  When I drove it home, I just bought a few extra filters to carry with me.  Never had a problem, but each time I put fuel in after that, I just always put on a new filter (at least for the next 5 fillups).
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« Reply #3 on: June 19, 2006, 10:26:07 AM »

Both good answers! Might run some fuel additive in it next time you fuel up, but it really should be ok after driving it 1600 miles just be sure to change the filters and carry a couple spares! BK
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GeorgeMyers
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« Reply #4 on: June 19, 2006, 11:54:24 AM »

Putting a pressure gauge in after the filters will tell you how much pressure is going to the injectors. When the filters start to clog, the pressure drops. The gauge should be on the dash so you can check it while driving at highway speed. It drops to almost nothing at idle. If it starts to drop while at speed, you know you have a problem. Seeing it at normal pressure (about 65 psi on mine) is very reassuring. This is well worth having for anyone.
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DrivingMissLazy
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« Reply #5 on: June 19, 2006, 01:05:11 PM »

I also had a pressure guage, dash mounted and it ran in the 60-65 psi range also. Never in 15 years of ownership and 150,000 miles did I ever have to change a filter. The bus did sit for long periods of time without being run..
Richard


Putting a pressure gauge in after the filters will tell you how much pressure is going to the injectors. When the filters start to clog, the pressure drops. The gauge should be on the dash so you can check it while driving at highway speed. It drops to almost nothing at idle. If it starts to drop while at speed, you know you have a problem. Seeing it at normal pressure (about 65 psi on mine) is very reassuring. This is well worth having for anyone.
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« Reply #6 on: June 19, 2006, 04:51:02 PM »

Our FuelPro 382 has the filter in a clear plastic bowl so you can see the filter (or algae, lack of fuel, or air bibbles). The filter has a line on it near the top and the lettering "Replace Filter Filter When Filter Reaches This Level" . We have changed the filter once on 6 years/28,000 miles.  We carry extra fuel fliters for the 8V71 and the Generator.  Jack
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