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Author Topic: Pit price  (Read 3179 times)
johns4104s
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« on: October 16, 2008, 03:53:51 PM »

Got a price on a 40 ft x 14 ft slab with a 4fth x4ftw x 20 ft long  pit x 6" thick  for $5,550.00 do you think this is sounds about right Huh?

John
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luvrbus
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« Reply #1 on: October 16, 2008, 04:00:40 PM »

sounds about right $3.00 sf for flat work $10.00 sf for walls 2 years ago that would have been on the cheap side     good luck
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John316
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« Reply #2 on: October 16, 2008, 04:25:48 PM »

Concrete is running about 130 a cu. yd. Figure up how much concrete is needed and then you can tell roughly how much labor is. Your price sounds about right for our area. Flat work is certainly cheaper than pouring the walls. Does this price include digging the pit or not?

God bless,

John
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Tom Y
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« Reply #3 on: October 16, 2008, 04:40:21 PM »

John, Would a 5 foot high pit work better?  Tom Y
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Tom Yaegle
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« Reply #4 on: October 16, 2008, 05:01:56 PM »

depends on how tall he is    Grin
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« Reply #5 on: October 16, 2008, 05:02:31 PM »

When I built my shop (which I no longer have) I went 5 feet deep and then used a small step stool in the pit.  Made it much easier to work in.

I would also suggest a slight slope in the bottom and a sump pump at one end.  Even if it never floods, it makes it much easier to hose down the floor for clean up.  I also piped in electric and compressed air, a great convenience.
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« Reply #6 on: October 16, 2008, 05:03:20 PM »

Have no idea about your $bid$ price.  Been out of the trades way too long.  Does that include entry steps, a per code drain(s), brackets or slots for various level stands and wiring/switches for required lighting?  Also, have you considered going a little deeper for the pit?  Smiley Smiley Smiley
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johns4104s
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« Reply #7 on: October 16, 2008, 06:03:19 PM »



The price does include the digging. I will have to put The light,air and sump pump in. I was going to use a cut of ladder, but I bet I could get them to put steps in. The reason for the 4 ft depth is that the water table by the coast is low.

John
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« Reply #8 on: October 16, 2008, 06:57:16 PM »

John, Don't you love the people who don't answer the questions? I hope, as heres another. You may want to measure between your duals, is 4 feet to wide?  Goodluck  Tom Y
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« Reply #9 on: October 16, 2008, 07:05:53 PM »



The price does include the digging. I will have to put The light,air and sump pump in. I was going to use a cut of ladder, but I bet I could get them to put steps in. The reason for the 4 ft depth is that the water table by the coast is low.

John
John, Surely you mean the water table on the coast is 'shallow'?
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makemineatwostroke
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« Reply #10 on: October 16, 2008, 07:12:51 PM »

  On the Texas coast I think he means the water table is high   


have a great evening
« Last Edit: October 16, 2008, 07:27:14 PM by makemineatwostroke » Logged
Nick Badame Refrig/ACC
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« Reply #11 on: October 16, 2008, 07:26:12 PM »

Hi John,

Having a pit for 20 years, I would suggest that you go 5ft deep. You may get a sore back with all the bending over....

Another place you can save $$ is the legenth. You can cut it back to 15ft and just move the bus over the work area or just turn the

bus around to work on the front end.

My dad's pit measures 15'L x 5'H x 4'W and worked just fine.

Good Luck
Nick-
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luvrbus
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« Reply #12 on: October 16, 2008, 07:42:10 PM »

If there is a problem with water at 5 ft he is doing the smart thing by going 4 ft it cost a several bucks to waterproof concrete and without a drain around the wall it is still a problem      good luck
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« Reply #13 on: October 16, 2008, 10:49:39 PM »

About problem with high water table....you can raise the concrete's earth base up with good packing fill dirt about a foot to achieve the needed depth.

FWIW

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« Reply #14 on: October 16, 2008, 11:04:03 PM »

johns...I'm sorry if it appeared I was nitpicking.  Didn't intend too. I also had a high water table to deal with in SW Oregon years ago.  Others have already suggested "raising the pad".

Shortening the length of the pit never occured to me.  Brilliant.  About the only thing I can think of and forgot before is maybe the need for plumbed airline pipes and stuff.

This sounds silly, but...how about wiring in a landline telephone jack at each end?  Dunno if your have cell service or not.  Lots and lots of extras.  Used to drive us crazy.  Smiley Smiley Smiley
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« Reply #15 on: October 17, 2008, 04:14:14 AM »

John if memory serves me right, I put 5yds in floor, 5yds, in the walls 5yds in the apron. 15x4 5 deep works great. As said before can use small ladder to clim up into bus if needed, mostly all is at arms length. Drive bus to 2, 3ft of end use ladder to go under. Pull over few feet for rear. Had a problem pulling over the great void, solved that with 2 4x8 sheets of aluminum plates placed over the hole(not to drive on just cover up the hole) Can worm them out easy enough. Built dry sumps in each corner with 2 inch pvc through bottom of wall. The barn I put over, did not have to be as tall as planed. The key is scissor trusses, always check by the truss plant to see if weeds are growing around pile of trusses (got them cheep). On the price done all work myself with helpers hired when needed apr. 4000. Now I had alot of things available to me your average busnut just don't have(compliments of my junk yards).
  Your price turn key may not be to bad....when asked why I did all this, the answer..SAFTY.. Oh by the way it doubles as the Airstream motorhome cover when not in use.
               Danny
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johns4104s
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« Reply #16 on: October 17, 2008, 05:03:52 AM »



Does anyone know what heavy duty material I can use to cover the pit when the bus is gone, This would play in the size of the angle I use to concrete in around the edges.
Tom, Thanks, I will remember to measure between the duals.

John

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Nick Badame Refrig/ACC
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« Reply #17 on: October 17, 2008, 05:12:07 AM »

Hi John,

You can have your concrete guy make a recessed lip at the top of the pit that is about 2" on the inside.

When the bus is gone, you can cut 2"x12" plank boards to fill the entire top of the pit.

My dad did it that way and after the plank boards, he covered the wood with a strip of rubber matt and

you couldn't even tell the pit was there. You can also cut an I-beam to fit the opening to use for jacking of bus

parts that are over the pit hole.

Good Luck
Nick-
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« Reply #18 on: October 17, 2008, 08:35:00 AM »

Hi John,

Remember this phrase "Build it and They We will come!"

Hope you get it done soon as I need to use it! HA

Good Luck and for those of you guys who have one, this is what every Bus Nut dreams of.

Paul
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Sam 4106
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« Reply #19 on: October 17, 2008, 10:00:58 AM »

Hi Guys,
I built my pit 44" wide X 5' deep X 20' long. I have never used more than 12' of the length. I cover the 12' of the pit I use with 44" X 48" pieces of 3/4" plywood, and the 8' I don't use with 3/8" aluminum deck plate. I recently bought an old scissor lift that I plan to put in the bottom of my pit. When the platform is up it will cover the hole. When I want to use the pit I will ride the platform down to whatever height is comfortable to work from. When completly lowered, the platform will be 5' below the floor. Any one have a 120 volt single phase AC electric hydraulic unit for sale to replace the 12 Volt battery pump I have now. If so my home number is 507 area code 895 local 3216. I don't have a cell phone, so if I don't answer, please leave a message
Thanks, Sam 4106
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« Reply #20 on: October 17, 2008, 04:56:53 PM »

Sometimes it's crazy how threads morph.  Are you in "storm" country?  Maybe you can modify your pit into a shelter or swimming pool.  Of course plugging something in while wading might not be a good idea, but being able to live thru a tornado might be cool also.  Smiley Smiley Smiley
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makemineatwostroke
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« Reply #21 on: October 17, 2008, 08:25:48 PM »

John; we have metal floor grate on ours if you are in a industrial area the stuff is cheap at junk yards get the guy to pour you a angle iron frame in the concrete and cut the grate to size I have 5 pcs 4x4 for 20 ft plus you can drive on it   have a great evening
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« Reply #22 on: October 18, 2008, 06:25:44 PM »

Can you drive the bus in it or just the toad?

Thx

John
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makemineatwostroke
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« Reply #23 on: October 19, 2008, 09:09:19 AM »

John; yes you can drive on it but you need a beam (5 in) where each of the sections join I have 3 removable beams in mine look at the drains in truck docks they have floor grating        have a great day
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« Reply #24 on: October 19, 2008, 07:16:26 PM »

From a safety standpoint, plan to have the pit covered when not in use.

A fall into the pit can grievously injure or kill.

The trade magazines also have vendors who sell sliding nets for use to catch the unaware.

Make whatever cover you choose easy to use, or you'll start leaving it open...

You would be surprised at the number of people who step off the edge in a facility they have worked in for years!

happy coaching!
buswarrior
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johns4104s
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« Reply #25 on: October 19, 2008, 08:41:06 PM »

Bus Warrier,

Thank You Excellent point,

John
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« Reply #26 on: October 20, 2008, 04:33:05 AM »

A friend had a piece of steel angle iron set in the concrete all the way around the top edge of his pit. He then welded a small section on pipe in each corner to serve as a socket for removable pipe stanchions that have lightweight chain running between them. They are kept in place anytime a vehicle is not over the pit.  Jack
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« Reply #27 on: October 20, 2008, 09:04:58 AM »

Sometimes it's crazy how threads morph.  Are you in "storm" country?  Maybe you can modify your pit into a shelter or swimming pool.  Of course plugging something in while wading might not be a good idea, but being able to live thru a tornado might be cool also.  Smiley Smiley Smiley

Or a hot tub,  you could come out from under your bus all clean and relaxed Cheesy,  Who says it not good therapy. Grin
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« Reply #28 on: October 20, 2008, 09:42:08 AM »

Oh yeah, a lap pool with a wave machine.
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