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Author Topic: Insulation  (Read 5103 times)
John316
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MCI 1995 DL3, DD S60, Allison B500.




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« Reply #15 on: October 24, 2008, 08:13:56 AM »

BS, what about squeaks when you are driving? Seems like the foam sheets would rub and squeak a lot. Inquiring minds want to know. Grin

God bless,

John
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MCI 1995 DL3. DD S60 with a Allison B500.
Blacksheep
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« Reply #16 on: October 24, 2008, 08:17:31 AM »

Squeeks? Well to be honest, I have NEVER heard any squeeks! My bus appears to be pretty solid and although I only have about a dozen trips, I have yet to have anything come loose or move and litterally no noises including squeeks!

Ace
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John316
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« Reply #17 on: October 24, 2008, 08:32:30 AM »

Thanks I was just wondering, because I have noticed sheet foam will squeak if it is rubbed with something. Obviously you did a good job with you conversion!!!

Thanks again,

God bless,

John
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MCI 1995 DL3. DD S60 with a Allison B500.
cody
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« Reply #18 on: October 24, 2008, 09:04:50 AM »

John, I used 1/8 inch felt weatherstripping along the metal behind the plywood, it offered a thermal break between metal and wood and it totally eliminated any tendancy for the plywood or foam to squeak.
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John316
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« Reply #19 on: October 24, 2008, 09:10:08 AM »

Excellent idea Cody!!! Thanks. We will implement this.

Thanks again,

God bless,

John
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MCI 1995 DL3. DD S60 with a Allison B500.
busshawg
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« Reply #20 on: October 24, 2008, 10:19:48 AM »

For what it's worth I have done exactly what you are wanting to do. It all went very well. Sprayed the walls from the inside, used a grinder with a saw blade to even it out ( hang on tightly) and then lined with 5/8 plywood. In my opion it went well and I don't have to worry about where to mount things on the walls. I then bought vinyl and glued in over the plywood. I made a nice solid, well isulated wall that looks good.

Good Luck
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Have Fun!!
Grant
busshawg
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« Reply #21 on: October 24, 2008, 10:23:44 AM »

Forgot to mention, no squeaking. I think the guys that are getting the sqeaking maybe the ones whom have tried to cut foa insulation to fit ion their walls, the spray in , in my opion is the way to go.

Have fun!
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Have Fun!!
Grant
Blacksheep
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« Reply #22 on: October 24, 2008, 12:13:18 PM »

Busshawg with all due respect, I would have to disagree.My bus has NO squeeks and here is a pic of how I applied the foam boards!

Ace
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VAN
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« Reply #23 on: October 24, 2008, 12:22:38 PM »

Ace nice clean job,thats what I'm talking about.Question though? on the walls did you run the ferring strips horizontally across the walls?thanx, Van
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Blacksheep
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« Reply #24 on: October 24, 2008, 12:24:26 PM »

Van the firring strips run vertical. Everywhere you see foil tape going vertical is a firring strip. 16 inch on center!

Ace
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JohnEd
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« Reply #25 on: October 24, 2008, 12:26:23 PM »

John,

I had a friend on this board many years ago.  He spray foamed his bus and then ground it down.  He was assured that the foam is nontoxic and that he could get away with just a simple dust mask.  A few months after doing that job he started having respiratory problems.  He doctored and limped through a couple years and nobody could determin his problem other than he was a sick puppy.  He eventually found that he had inhaled "fine dust" from the grinding and that stuff was permanently inside him and screwing up the function of his lungs.  What they meant when they told him he didn't have anything to worry about from grinding was the use of a very course grinder that rips of small chunks of foam.  He used a grinding/course sanding wheel that made "dust".  It ruined his life and we all know how much good health is valued by Bus Knuts.  Be vary careful my friend and any vent. system that pushes the dust out of the bus in front of you is a superb idea...fan blowing in the window at the rear and work to the front.

FWIW,

John
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Jeremy
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« Reply #26 on: October 24, 2008, 12:54:07 PM »

My bus has an 'inner skin' of steel sheet welded over all the body framing below the windows; between this and the outer skin is old-style fibreglass roof insulation, which I'm sure isn't ideal for a motorhome but I'm not about to cut all the steel sheet off in order to change it. How much of a problem 'only' having this fibreglass insulation will be I'm not sure.

I can at least insulate the roof properly as here the framing is exposed in the normal way - but because only the roof can be done I'm not sure whether organising someone to come and spray foam is the best option, especially as I shall be running all the electrical cabing through the roof space, plus I need space for fresh air ducting, light fittings etc. Is foam still the right option here or would I would be better off installing modern multi-layer foil insulation? I've never used the foil stuff before, but as I understand it it is vastly better than either fibreglass or polyurethene foam, and could be fitted in such a way that areas could be removed in future to access electrical trunking etc.

Is this a good idea, or should I go the conventional route of sprayed foam? Also, should I be worrying about my fibreglass-insulated walls?

Jeremy
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Blacksheep
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« Reply #27 on: October 24, 2008, 01:00:39 PM »

Jeremy I far from an expert on insulating but to my knowledge the home type fiberglass insulation is bad if it gets wet. It just does no good what so ever so make sure you have no leaks of any kind that will allow the insulation to get wet. As far as the ceiling goes? I would run all the wiring you need to run before you have it sprayed. If you want to insulate in a matter such as what I did on my walls, (which I didn't do on my ceiling because it was factory sprayed), yes you can remove the panels at a later time to run wires, cables, ducting etc.. Will it do the same job as sprayed foam? Not for me to say as I said, I'm no expert but what I do know is, anything is better than nothing at all!

Ace
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John316
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« Reply #28 on: October 24, 2008, 03:03:40 PM »

John, thanks for very important reminder. I feel badly for your friend, but we will heed the advice that he didn't. We have the big ugly respirators. You know the kind that has a couple of big ugly round filters on them, and when you put them on you feel like you have asthma Cheesy Cheesy Cheesy, yup that's the ones alright that we will use. I also like your vent idea.

busshawg, thanks for the tips.

Ace I like the pics. You did a great job.

Thanks for the advice.

God bless,

John
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MCI 1995 DL3. DD S60 with a Allison B500.
TomC
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« Reply #29 on: October 24, 2008, 05:06:19 PM »

I screwed 1x2 fir strips 90 degree to the metal uprights and roof bows.  Then had 2.25" of foam sprayed in (nasty job-one that I will ALWAYS have done for me).  I covered the walls with 1/4" plywood and the ceiling with 1/8" since it bends to the contour of the roof.  With the 1x2's under, and 1x3 ash strips screwed to the ceiling where my overhead cabinets are, I can add to the walls or ceilings if I want, or take apart since everything is screwed.  I covered the walls with gray outdoor carpet and painted the ceiling white with oak strips covering the 1x2's.  Is very effective-only need two roof top A/C's in 107 degree weather.  Good Luck, TomC
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